Butternut Soup Accomplished

The earlier post on butternut squash soup managed to convince us of what we should have for dinner tonight.

We used the roasting method and also, we rinsed the seeds from the squash and toasted them with salt, pepper, and garlic powder.  They made a nice, crunchy garnish.


Fall Means Butternut Squash

With the cold weather suddenly descending on New York, it seems like a good time to swing into our fall recipes in earnest.  During our recent apple-picking trip, we also bought a butternut squash – a core piece of autumn produce.  We’ve posted a number of good butternut recipes over the lat few years, but looking back over our archives I was surprised not to find a post on what is probably our quintessential use for this gourd: butternut squash soup.  Ubiquitous, yes, but also delicious, easy, and requiring very few ingredients.

Butternut Squash Soup

1 large onion, chopped

1 butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cubed

olive oil

salt and pepper

vegetable broth (but water works too)

Really, the hardest part of this whole recipe is preparing the squash itself.  I have yet to find a peeling method that doesn’t seem more difficult than it should be.  Once you’ve got it peeled, seeded, and cut into cubes, you can go one of two routes.  The easiest possible cooking method is to start by cooking the onions in the soup pot (with olive oil, salt and pepper, until translucent), then add several cups of broth or water, dump in the squash, bring to a boil, then cook until the squash is soft.

However, if you want to go the extra mile, you can roast the squash cubes in the oven (still with olive oil, maybe even adding some rosemary or sage) until they get brown, cook the onions and broth as described above, and then add the squash to the broth already cooked.  This method will generally produce a richer-tasting soup in my experience.

In either case, you end up with cooked squash and onion in hot broth, which you then want to blend.  We have an immersion blender which is ideal for the job, but you could also transfer to a blender or food processor in batches.  Serve it with a crispy bread.

This is one of those recipes that we tend to eyeball, rather than having exact measurements.  Some trial and error will get you to a point where you know what ratios of onion, squash, and broth you want to use in order to get a blended soup with your preferred consistency.


Pasta with Broccoli and Roasted Squash

This dish involved a couple different elements that were cooked separately and then combined at the end. First, I roasted a cubed butternut squash with olive oil and fresh thyme (plus S&P). Meanwhile, I heated water for pasta (we used egg linguine). When the squash was getting towards done, I sauteed broccoli, also in olive oil, with some lemon juice, chopped parsley, and a bit of parmesan, tossing some chick peas into the pan after a couple of minutes.

Once the squash nice and tender, the broccoli lightly cooked but still crisp, and the chickpeas slightly browned, they all got piled on the pasta with some more fresh parsley, and extra pinch of parmesan, and some sunflower kernels.


Red Quinoa with Butternut Squash

Okay, so I delayed quite a bit in posting this dinner from last week. We had some butternut squash that a friend brought over. Tina roasted it up with some olive oil and rosemary and then set it aside for later use. That use ended up being as accompaniment to some red quinoa. I sauteed some onions in olive oil, then added the quinoa, that was cooked with salt, pepper, and cumin, plus the squash, fresh parsley (diced) and some slivered almonds.


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